putting it out there

160520_Deborah_close

If we are to repair the world,
we must change the stories we tell.

A play is a cataclysm in which a character’s relationship with their world changes irrevocably, irretrievably. In our world, perception and magical thinking pass for action: In the worlds I create, people take action rather than merely feel or say. They don’t just learn, they alter.

I am in love with the music of language and the language of music, hot for surrealist brain-pinging, unconcerned with pre-frontal control issues, a creator of compassion borne of our differences. I use language to transmute synaptic activity much as The Ring Cycle uses music; I reframe history rather than re re re retell conflicting, conflicted stories of how/who/what we have already been.

Theater is in a Paula Vogel-described decadent phase. The next step in that cycle is a return to the näive, and many are simplifying, stultifying, sketch-comedy-izing the nobility of wrighting plays. I respect audiences’ intelligence by adding geometry to form: Instead of dumbing down or mocking a play’s dramatic conflict, each of my characters carries their own. When one’s objective meets another character’s want, their mutual complexity forces unexpected yet entirely earned responses. From both characters and audience.

There’s a great flaming ball of compassion at the heart of my works. Not “ooh, I feel so sorry for you” but nonjudgmental empathy for each character doing unblemished activities you or I might not – or might have done and hidden – so that we can see ourselves clearly, and all evolve.
Together.

Yes, I’m here to repair the world. One play at a time.

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s