I’m not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV

The intuitive, creative, collaborative – some say, derivative – nature of writing brings up a whole passel of dangers.

Universities have long dealt with the vagaries of plagiarism.

Corporate contracts claim ownership of ideas/work done on their premises.

Even in the science world, publishers often retain copyrights.

Copyright laws are meant to protect the originator of a work.  However, copyright law has extended well beyond the life-span of a creator.  Here’s a little video – a bit jouncy but remarkably clear – that explains the whole deal.

I’m not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV (sorry, Peter Bergman, and yes, you were the victim of writers), so I’ll say only two more things on this subject: public domain and Anthony Verna (an attorney specializing in copyright law), whose informative and helpful seminar I attended a few years ago.

Happy Writing!
©2012 all rights reserved

Advertisements

One thought on “I’m not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV

  1. from Geralyn on FB: “Brilliant! All this has happened during my lifetime. Stories I loved as a child and happily imagined adapting into plays and musicals have been copyrighted, extended, and are now out of reach far past my death even if I live to be as old as the oldest recorded human! (I used to think, well, if I can keep all my marbles and write till I’m in my nineties, like Sophocles or Shaw, I’ll be able to…..) Mine is the first generation of writers forbidden to build on the work of the recent past. Generations behind me must cope with the unprecedented access digital copying allows and the law forbids. Good luck with that, children!”

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s